Greg Walters’ copy of the Spécimen-Album from Gravure et Fonderie de C. Derriey (Paris, 1862). At the American Typecasting Fellowship conference; Picqua, Ohio

Greg Walters’ copy of the Spécimen-Album from Gravure et Fonderie de C. Derriey (Paris, 1862). At the American Typecasting Fellowship conference; Picqua, Ohio

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Saturday, 1st March 2014
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Saturday, 1st March 2014
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Friday, 28th February 2014

(Source: Flickr / n1ke)

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Friday, 28th February 2014
womenofgraphicdesign:

Priscilla Balmer of Swiss design studio A3

womenofgraphicdesign:

Priscilla Balmer of Swiss design studio A3

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Friday, 28th February 2014

A pairing of Tolstoy’s most spiritual and existential works of fiction and nonfiction from the renowned translator of Turgenev and Chekhov.
In the last two days of his own life, Peter Carson completed these new translations of The Death of Ivan Ilyich and Confession before he succumbed to cancer in January 2013. Carson, the eminent British publisher, editor, and translator who, in the words of his author Mary Beard, “had probably more influence on the literary landscape of [England] over the past fifty years than any other single person,” must have seen the irony of translating Ilyich, Tolstoy’s profound meditation on death and loss, “but he pressed on regardless, apparently refusing to be distracted by the parallel of literature and life.” In Carson’s shimmering prose, these two transcendent works are presented in their most faithful rendering in English. Unlike so many previous translations that have tried to smooth out Tolstoy’s rough edges, Carson presents a translation that captures the verisimilitude and psychological realism of the original Russian text.

A pairing of Tolstoy’s most spiritual and existential works of fiction and nonfiction from the renowned translator of Turgenev and Chekhov.

In the last two days of his own life, Peter Carson completed these new translations of The Death of Ivan Ilyich and Confession before he succumbed to cancer in January 2013. Carson, the eminent British publisher, editor, and translator who, in the words of his author Mary Beard, “had probably more influence on the literary landscape of [England] over the past fifty years than any other single person,” must have seen the irony of translating Ilyich, Tolstoy’s profound meditation on death and loss, “but he pressed on regardless, apparently refusing to be distracted by the parallel of literature and life.” In Carson’s shimmering prose, these two transcendent works are presented in their most faithful rendering in English. Unlike so many previous translations that have tried to smooth out Tolstoy’s rough edges, Carson presents a translation that captures the verisimilitude and psychological realism of the original Russian text.

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Thursday, 27th February 2014
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Thursday, 27th February 2014

(Source: flickr.com)

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Wednesday, 26th February 2014

(Source: behance.net)

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Monday, 24th February 2014

(Source: behance.net)

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Sunday, 23rd February 2014
World where fish eat humans
World where fish eat humans
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Sunday, 23rd February 2014
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Saturday, 22nd February 2014

One Nutrition is a Danish brand of supplements for athletes. Supplements can be beneficial for most athletes, but this fact is often lost in branding strategies catering only to body builders. By applying a simple and authentic visual scheme and speaking in a simple and direct tone, One Nutrition aims to show that their products are in fact healthy and not harmful.

A bespoke typeface called Victor is the center of the identity.

(Source: behance.net)

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Thursday, 20th February 2014
millionsmillions:

In the latest entry in By Heart, which I’ve written about before, Thirty Girls author Susan Minot explains why she prefers to read multiple books at once instead of reading through single books from start to finish. Her reasoning? Books are “worlds to dip in and out of, and my relationship to them is continually deepening and evolving.”

millionsmillions:

In the latest entry in By Heart, which I’ve written about before, Thirty Girls author Susan Minot explains why she prefers to read multiple books at once instead of reading through single books from start to finish. Her reasoning? Books are “worlds to dip in and out of, and my relationship to them is continually deepening and evolving.”

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Wednesday, 19th February 2014