(Source: typochondria)

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Monday, 14th April 2014
julialukedesign:

Aleksei Kruchenykh. Universal War. Ъ [Cyrillic hard sign], 1916
A bold Cyrillic hard sign - Ъ - is placed prominently in the center of the cover of this book, made by the vanguard Russian poet Aleksei Kruchenykh and published in 1916. English translations usually omit the hard sign from the title’s translation, and include only Universal War written above. Yet it is this awkward unpronounceable letter of the Russian alphabet that best conveys the groundbreaking character of Kruchenykh’s poetry and his collages inside. Zaum (trans-rational) poetry aimed to unlink the form of a word from an automatic association with a given meaning by using word fragments and creating unexpected juxtapositions of words and letters. In Russian written language before 1917, every consonant at the end of a word was followed by either a soft or a hard sign. While the soft sign actually modified pronunciation, the hard sign merely indicated a lack of change. As such many saw it as obsolete, and by 1916 debates were raging about the need to eliminate the hard sign from Russian spelling in order to modernize it. Kruchenykh seems to equate the redundancy of this letter with the absurdity of World War I.
(via: http://inventingabstraction.tumblr.com/)

julialukedesign:

Aleksei Kruchenykh. Universal War. Ъ [Cyrillic hard sign], 1916

A bold Cyrillic hard sign - Ъ - is placed prominently in the center of the cover of this book, made by the vanguard Russian poet Aleksei Kruchenykh and published in 1916. English translations usually omit the hard sign from the title’s translation, and include only Universal War written above. Yet it is this awkward unpronounceable letter of the Russian alphabet that best conveys the groundbreaking character of Kruchenykh’s poetry and his collages inside. Zaum (trans-rational) poetry aimed to unlink the form of a word from an automatic association with a given meaning by using word fragments and creating unexpected juxtapositions of words and letters. In Russian written language before 1917, every consonant at the end of a word was followed by either a soft or a hard sign. While the soft sign actually modified pronunciation, the hard sign merely indicated a lack of change. As such many saw it as obsolete, and by 1916 debates were raging about the need to eliminate the hard sign from Russian spelling in order to modernize it. Kruchenykh seems to equate the redundancy of this letter with the absurdity of World War I.

(via: http://inventingabstraction.tumblr.com/)

(via twentysixtypes)

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Monday, 14th April 2014

Frieze Foundation is a non-profit organisation responsible for the curated programme at Frieze Art Fair, comprising artist commissions (Frieze Projects), talks (Frieze Talks), films (Frieze Film), music (Frieze Music), and education (Frieze Education).

Kellenberger–White was commissioned to create an identity responding to the Foundation’s expanding off-site programme, which was led by their newly appointed curator Sarah McCrory. The identity is typographic and made for both print and digital environments. The design concept for the letterforms was inspired by art historian and critic Thomas Crow’s idea of ‘art pushing against the architecture that houses it’ (Contemporary Art Versus Its Envelope: Competition and Co-Evolution, Frieze Talks 2005, Saturday 22 October).

The starting point of the design was an image of blocks that could represent any flat architectural space, or even a plan of the gallery booths at Frieze Art Fair. Frieze Foundation is everything that goes on beyond and between these blocks, and pushes against it; this idea was visually translated into a bold letter pushing against its surrounding blocks.

(Source: kellenberger-white.com)

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Monday, 14th April 2014
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Sunday, 13th April 2014
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Sunday, 13th April 2014
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Saturday, 12th April 2014

We all have our favourite books – a story which has filled our heart; a cook book from which we’ve made every recipe and whose pages are stuck together with egg whites and capers (does anyone really like capers?), or a gardening book that has inspired us to transform a patch of weeds into something magical.

Mac and Ninny believe that if you love your books you should label them, and make sure you get them back (if you lend them out), by badging them with one of our beautiful bookplates.

(Source: macandninny.com)

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Friday, 11th April 2014

Book design for “Lola”, Maraveyas’ new music album/book. The book consists of two parts, a short novel and a booklet, while in the last page you can also find the cd with Maraveyas’ new songs.

A soft, red plastic with gold screen-printing was used to cover the 144 pages, 5-fluo color printed book.

(Source: bobstudio.gr)

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Friday, 11th April 2014

A post-it style calendar for Italian paper company Fedrigoni, with a page-per-day, a colour-per-month and perforated fold-up numbers.

(Source: mattwilley.co.uk)

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Friday, 11th April 2014
khartoon:

The abstract pattern is more than just decoration. It’s a so-called Tughra, the mark of the Sultan. In a tughra, the Sultan’s name gets turned into a striking emblem or insignia, The document you’re looking at is a ‘ferman’ or imperial decree.
So generally documents like this were not made for display, but obviously when you displayed it in some sort of judicial or other setting, the fact that it was so grand almost meant that no-one could argue before they’d even read it.
there are two compartments; the lower one is filled with little clumps of flowers and above that is an abstract pattern which we call an arabesque.  And the uprights have similar patterns but the variety is given by the use of plain or gold grounds. So this is not just a text, it’s also one of the finest examples of Ottoman illumination as an art form.
I work in The Museum Of Islamic Art in Doha, Qatar so I know this stuff :)

khartoon:

The abstract pattern is more than just decoration. It’s a so-called Tughra, the mark of the Sultan. In a tughra, the Sultan’s name gets turned into a striking emblem or insignia, The document you’re looking at is a ‘ferman’ or imperial decree.

So generally documents like this were not made for display, but obviously when you displayed it in some sort of judicial or other setting, the fact that it was so grand almost meant that no-one could argue before they’d even read it.

there are two compartments; the lower one is filled with little clumps of flowers and above that is an abstract pattern which we call an arabesque.  And the uprights have similar patterns but the variety is given by the use of plain or gold grounds. So this is not just a text, it’s also one of the finest examples of Ottoman illumination as an art form.

I work in The Museum Of Islamic Art in Doha, Qatar so I know this stuff :)

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Thursday, 10th April 2014

ILEKO CALENDAR is a new type of calendar which you can look both monthly calendar and weekly calendar on the same page. One set of 2 books and each book contains a half year calendar.

(Source: amiizaki.com)

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Wednesday, 9th April 2014
thingsfoundonbookshelves:

The Balloon Man by Charlotte Armstrong (1968) (x)

thingsfoundonbookshelves:

The Balloon Man by Charlotte Armstrong (1968) (x)

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Tuesday, 8th April 2014

Design & Art Direction for the RMIT Fine Arts Graduation Catalogue.

(Source: leifpodhajsky.com)

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Tuesday, 8th April 2014

ZINEA ripple by a drop from nameless echoes,River is formed by the rills of different roots.

ZINE
A ripple by a drop from nameless echoes,
River is formed by the rills of different roots.

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Monday, 7th April 2014

A selection of prints that celebrate the astrophysicist Neil DeGrasse Tyson as an unsung hero. Includes a bespoke typeface based on star formation, and selected quotes from his interview with Times Magazine, where he responds to the question “What is the most astounding fact about the universe?”

(Source: justinevhm.co.uk)

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Monday, 7th April 2014